Skip to main content

About your Search

20100901
20100930
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
house correspondent bill plante is a traveling with the president an joins us now from the u.n. good morning, bill. >> reporter: good morning, harry. the president will make a plea for mideast peace today, telling leaders at the u.n. the u.s. supports the efforts of freeing the world of nuclear weapons but the expected midterm staff shake-up seems to be under way. president obama's inner circle appears to be moving on out of the west wing. cbs news learned that david a l axelrod moving to chicago next spring for a campaign for re-election. the dominos don't stop there. ram emanuel, the president's chief of staff may leave the white house next month. he told colleagues he's very likely to run for mayor of chicago. gibbs told reporters on air force one, i'm not going to rule anything in or out. he's in the process of thinking through what's best for rahm. the staff shake-up comes as the president addresses the u.n. general assembly this week to focus on america's place as a global leader. >> let me be clear. the united states of america has been and will remain the global leader in pr
is a big concern as these downpours continue to hit us. they have come through overnight into the morning hours. the rain just picking up on us moments ago. the worst of what we're being told is we've been dealing with this all morning. the bad news about that, it's not going away anytime soon as we are expected to continue dealing with this flooding and water collecting and gathering south florida as the day goes on. harry. >> sherry williams, thank you very much. we go over to dave price and find out where this storm is headed g. morning, sir. >> she was right. we are just seeing the storm pick up, not very well organized right now but going over the florida peninsula around south florida into the atlantic where it will get some energy and that rotation is going to be more well formed. our biggest concerns, once it moves through florida, rolling into the carolinas, places like wilmington already pounded, another three possibly to eight inches of rain expected as this system begins to zoom on up the coast and, again, it is going to follow a quick path all the way through to the northeast
is a big concern as the downpours continue to hit us, coming through overnight and into the morning hours. the rain picking up on us moments ago. the worst of what we're being told is dealing with this all morning and not going away any time soon as we're expected to continue dealing with the flooding and water collecting and gathering in south florida as the day goes on. harry? >> thank you very much. we want to go to dave price and find out where this storm is headed. good morning, sir. >> you know what? she was right. just beginning to see the storm pick up. not well organized right now but goes over the florida peninsula, south florida, out into the atlantic and where it gets energy. and that rotation is going to be more well formed. the biggest concerns, once it moves through florida, rolling into the carolinas, places like wilmington already pounded and another three, possibly to eight inches of rain expected as this system begins to zoom on up the coast. and again, it is going to follow a quick path all the way through to the northeast. but the biggest concerns tomorrow, what could
bowers is in portage, wisconsin to bring us up to date. good morning, cindy. >> reporter: good morning, maggie. this earthen he levee is part of a series of dikes built mostly sand way back in the 1890s. sunday parts began to erode or give way as people in the historic town of portage are seeing the wisconsin river at its highest level since 1938. here in portage, the wisconsin river reached 20.5 feet sunday. that's even higher than the predicted crest, which forecastrs said wouldn't come until later today. 300 residents were asked to evacuate but those who stayed behind were trapped when local highways were shut down. >> they told us that we have -- that we had ten minutes to get out of there because they are blocking off all the roads back there. >> reporter: all this flooding was the result of extraordinarily heavy rains that fell across the upper midwest last week, as much as 10 to 12 inches in some areas. in the western wisconsin town of arcadia, some folks were allowed to return to their homes only to find their belongings water-logged. >> phone calls from a few friends letting m
us here in new york city. good morning, everyone. i'm maggie rodriguez. >> and we got soaked around here yesterday. good morning, everyone, i'm harry smith. of course in the midwest there's still a lot of cleanup and a lot of water piled up all over the place there. and the big story, then, turns out to be in southern california. california, a record-breaking heat wave making l.a. feel more like death valley. in downtown los angeles yesterday, thermometers topped out at 113 degrees, an all-time high. more than 30,000 customers lost power. and the l.a. department of water and power says it recorded its highest-ever demand for electricity. "early" show national correspondent hattie kauffman reports. >> reporter: talk about scorching. los angeles topped out at 113 degrees, the hottest day in l.a. history. it edged out the previous record set in 1990 by one degree. >> i'm going to melt. >> quite frankly, you can feel your skin searing in the heat of it. >> reporter: normally cool air blows in offshore but a high pressure system trapped the heat, which is not good news for firefighters b
. those who stayed behind were trapped when local highways were shut down. >> they told us we have -- that we had 10 minutes to get out of there because they are blocking off all of the roads back there. >> reporter: all of this flooding was the result of extraordinarily heavy rains that fell across the upper midwest last week, as much as 10 to 12 inches in some areas. in the western wisconsin town of arcadia, some folks were allowed to return to homes only to find their belongings waterlogged. >> phone calls from friends letting me know that flooding was occurring so i got up and my house was already full. >> reporter: water and mud wiped out everything in troy's basement and garage, even his new car. flood insurance will cover the damage but money isn't always enough. this was his grandparents' pool table. >> sentimental, you can't replace that. >> reporter: south dakota saw its worst flooding in 20 years. sunday the big sioux river was above flood stage. >> boy, you better get my stuff. >> reporter: 60 homes and 20 businesses were lost in zumbro falls. sweeping more than 12 feet
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)